Legacy Timeline

Memories and Milestones

I have a confession to make. I’ve spent every minute of the last sixty years with this firm, but I am as awed as anyone by what we’ve accomplished. When it comes to measuring the land, reshaping it, getting across it, or building on it, Dewberry has done it well.
Sid-Dewberry-Signature260w

Sid Dewberry, Chairman Emeritus

  • 1950s

    Friday the 13th—A Lucky Day

    Not superstitious, on Friday, April 13, 1956, a tiny firm with the long name of Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon opened its doors in Arlington, VA. At the helm were the 28-year-old Sid Dewberry, an engineer and surveyor, and 30-year-old Jim Nealon, a surveyor. The pair met just a few months earlier at M.T. Broyhill & Sons, a land development company cashing in on the post-WWII housing boom around the nation’s capital. When Broyhill offered to let them buy their department, they jumped at the chance. “Broyhill was willing to sell us all the surveying equipment, plus three or four pick-up trucks,” recalls Sid Dewberry. “He put a price of $7,000 on all of it.”

     

    1950s

    Friday the 13th—A Lucky Day

    Not superstitious, on Friday, April 13, 1956, a tiny firm with the long name of Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon opened its doors in Arlington, VA. At the helm were the 28-year-old Sid Dewberry, an engineer and surveyor, and 30-year-old Jim Nealon, a surveyor. The pair met just a few months earlier at M.T. Broyhill & Sons, a land development company cashing in on the post-WWII housing boom around the nation’s capital. When Broyhill offered to let them buy their department, they jumped at the chance. “Broyhill was willing to sell us all the surveying equipment, plus three or four pick-up trucks,” recalls Sid Dewberry. “He put a price of $7,000 on all of it.”

     
  • Greenhorne & O’Mara

    The firm began when M.T. Broyhill & Sons offered to sell their engineering division to Dewberry and Nealon for $7,000. Dewberry convinced his earlier employer, Greenhorne & O’Mara to bankroll the deal in exchange for one-third interest in the fledgling enterprise. Documents were signed, money changed hands, and in short order the new firm of Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon was in business.

    Greenhorne & O’Mara

    The firm began when M.T. Broyhill & Sons offered to sell their engineering division to Dewberry and Nealon for $7,000. Dewberry convinced his earlier employer, Greenhorne & O’Mara to bankroll the deal in exchange for one-third interest in the fledgling enterprise. Documents were signed, money changed hands, and in short order the new firm of Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon was in business.

  • Lincolnia Hills

    One of the firm’s first clients was M.T. Broyhill & Sons, who hired the young firm to assist with surveys and plans for the suburban housing development, Lincolnia Hills. Here is an ad from The Washington Post.

    Lincolnia Hills

    One of the firm’s first clients was M.T. Broyhill & Sons, who hired the young firm to assist with surveys and plans for the suburban housing development, Lincolnia Hills. Here is an ad from The Washington Post.

  • Resilience in a Bad Market

    Struggling to stay afloat in a lousy market, Dewberry and Nealon spent their first year in business promoting themselves tirelessly, meeting every real estate lawyer, county official...anyone that mattered. Deep in debt, exactly one year later, and 24 hours from shutting down the firm, two jobs finally came in, and the firm was saved.

    Resilience in a Bad Market

    Struggling to stay afloat in a lousy market, Dewberry and Nealon spent their first year in business promoting themselves tirelessly, meeting every real estate lawyer, county official...anyone that mattered. Deep in debt, exactly one year later, and 24 hours from shutting down the firm, two jobs finally came in, and the firm was saved.

  • The Arrival of Richard (Dick) Davis

    By 1958, local development was on the rise, and work began to pour in. Dewberry and Nealon quickly realized they needed help to meet the demand. Sid paid $600 to a headhunter to find the right candidate. Dick Davis took on the mantle of the firm’s chief engineer, freeing Dewberry and Nealon to develop new business. $600—one of the best investments they ever made.

    The Arrival of Richard (Dick) Davis

    By 1958, local development was on the rise, and work began to pour in. Dewberry and Nealon quickly realized they needed help to meet the demand. Sid paid $600 to a headhunter to find the right candidate. Dick Davis took on the mantle of the firm’s chief engineer, freeing Dewberry and Nealon to develop new business. $600—one of the best investments they ever made.

  • 1960s

    Building the Suburban Dream

    Despite the cultural turbulence and political drama that characterized the 60s, thousands of families quietly pursued the quintessential American dream: home ownership. New housing developments sprouted at the edges of old cities and towns. “When plans for the Beltway around Washington D.C., were announced in 1955, a long-term suburban boom was inevitable” says Sid Dewberry. “Of course, I wanted our firm to be in the thick of things.” Although not yet five years old in 1960, Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon were ready to play a role in bringing the large-scale residential community concept to the outlying regions of the nation’s capital.

    1960s

    Building the Suburban Dream

    Despite the cultural turbulence and political drama that characterized the 60s, thousands of families quietly pursued the quintessential American dream: home ownership. New housing developments sprouted at the edges of old cities and towns. “When plans for the Beltway around Washington D.C., were announced in 1955, a long-term suburban boom was inevitable” says Sid Dewberry. “Of course, I wanted our firm to be in the thick of things.” Although not yet five years old in 1960, Greenhorne, O’Mara, Dewberry & Nealon were ready to play a role in bringing the large-scale residential community concept to the outlying regions of the nation’s capital.

  • Montgomery Village

    One of the firm’s earliest forays into large-scale residential design and development, Montgomery Village was a planned community laid out on more than 2,000 acres of former farmland just north of D.C. The firm was responsible for engineering, survey, and joint land planning services. Now home to 40,000 residents, planning for Montgomery Village began in 1962 and ground was broken in 1966. The first families moved in on September 25, 1967. Dewberry continued work at Montgomery Village for more than 25 years.

    Montgomery Village

    One of the firm’s earliest forays into large-scale residential design and development, Montgomery Village was a planned community laid out on more than 2,000 acres of former farmland just north of D.C. The firm was responsible for engineering, survey, and joint land planning services. Now home to 40,000 residents, planning for Montgomery Village began in 1962 and ground was broken in 1966. The first families moved in on September 25, 1967. Dewberry continued work at Montgomery Village for more than 25 years.

  • Our First Computer

    Large-scale projects required new technical expertise and sophistication. The old rod-and-plat style rapidly lost ground to high-tech methods for accurately measuring large parcels of land quickly. In January 1964, the firm purchased its first computer, and began developing its own proprietary software for computations and site planning. “Computers really put us ahead in terms of service to the client,” explains Sid Dewberry. “The efficiency gave us a real price advantage. The technology, combined with our longstanding relationships with the key local agencies, supplied us with an edge over our competitors.”

    Our First Computer

    Large-scale projects required new technical expertise and sophistication. The old rod-and-plat style rapidly lost ground to high-tech methods for accurately measuring large parcels of land quickly. In January 1964, the firm purchased its first computer, and began developing its own proprietary software for computations and site planning. “Computers really put us ahead in terms of service to the client,” explains Sid Dewberry. “The efficiency gave us a real price advantage. The technology, combined with our longstanding relationships with the key local agencies, supplied us with an edge over our competitors.”

  • 10 Years Old, More than 50 Employees

    Large-scale development projects were multi-year in nature, and required ongoing design services. This led to stability and growth, allowing the firm to bring more talent in house. By 1965, and only a decade old, the firm grew to more than 50 employees and relocated to its own building in Fairfax County.

    10 Years Old, More than 50 Employees

    Large-scale development projects were multi-year in nature, and required ongoing design services. This led to stability and growth, allowing the firm to bring more talent in house. By 1965, and only a decade old, the firm grew to more than 50 employees and relocated to its own building in Fairfax County.

  • Lake Braddock

    A long-time friend and client, Steve Yeonas, hired the firm to work on another planned community in Fairfax County, VA. Lake Braddock would keep the firm busy in the late 60s.

    Lake Braddock

    A long-time friend and client, Steve Yeonas, hired the firm to work on another planned community in Fairfax County, VA. Lake Braddock would keep the firm busy in the late 60s.

  • Dewberry, Nealon & Davis

    In 1968, in spite of the firm’s growing success, Greenhorne & O’Mara decided to withdraw from the partnership, and the two enterprises parted amicably. Dewberry and Nealon invited chief engineer Dick Davis, by then a 10-year veteran of the firm, to become a 10% partner. The firm was renamed Dewberry, Nealon & Davis, and a new era began.

    Dewberry, Nealon & Davis

    In 1968, in spite of the firm’s growing success, Greenhorne & O’Mara decided to withdraw from the partnership, and the two enterprises parted amicably. Dewberry and Nealon invited chief engineer Dick Davis, by then a 10-year veteran of the firm, to become a 10% partner. The firm was renamed Dewberry, Nealon & Davis, and a new era began.

  • First Step Toward Diversification

    In 1968, architect James Maleady came aboard to help create an in-house architecture practice. Although still related to land development, the move represented the firm’s first real step toward diversification of services.

    First Step Toward Diversification

    In 1968, architect James Maleady came aboard to help create an in-house architecture practice. Although still related to land development, the move represented the firm’s first real step toward diversification of services.

  • New Office in Montgomery County

    After Maryland-based Greenhorne & O’Mara bowed out of the partnership in 1968, Dewberry, Nealon & Davis sought to establish a convenient, competitive presence on both sides of the Potomac. In 1969, the firm opened a branch office in Montgomery County, MD. The two offices would begin to pay dividends as the 1970s unfolded.

    New Office in Montgomery County

    After Maryland-based Greenhorne & O’Mara bowed out of the partnership in 1968, Dewberry, Nealon & Davis sought to establish a convenient, competitive presence on both sides of the Potomac. In 1969, the firm opened a branch office in Montgomery County, MD. The two offices would begin to pay dividends as the 1970s unfolded.

  • 1970s

    Mapping the Future

    In addition to ramping up a state-of-the-art flood insurance mapping operation to support its new HUD/FEMA work, the firm pushed the envelope, adding environmental engineering in response to growing public concern about water quality. Landscape architecture and infrastructure projects such as airports, recreational facilities, bridges, lakes, and roads complemented large-scale development projects. Dewberry reflects, “Some of our diversification was driven by our ongoing desire to tuck a few of our eggs into different baskets so we wouldn’t be too dependent on any one type of client or project. The thrill of being competitive was another driving force.”

    1970s

    Mapping the Future

    In addition to ramping up a state-of-the-art flood insurance mapping operation to support its new HUD/FEMA work, the firm pushed the envelope, adding environmental engineering in response to growing public concern about water quality. Landscape architecture and infrastructure projects such as airports, recreational facilities, bridges, lakes, and roads complemented large-scale development projects. Dewberry reflects, “Some of our diversification was driven by our ongoing desire to tuck a few of our eggs into different baskets so we wouldn’t be too dependent on any one type of client or project. The thrill of being competitive was another driving force.”

  • More Than 500 Employees

    The diversification of services and sheer scale of projects in the 70s led to a payroll of more than 500 employees by the end of the decade. Several new offices were also added around the greater Washington D.C., region.

    More Than 500 Employees

    The diversification of services and sheer scale of projects in the 70s led to a payroll of more than 500 employees by the end of the decade. Several new offices were also added around the greater Washington D.C., region.

  • Understanding People

    In the 70s, the public began demanding more say about the quality and style of the built environment. Engineers involved in public-sector work were encouraged to hone their listening skills, and patience, as public forums often were contentious. Dewberry’s experience in multi-party development projects gave it a leg up over the competition. Sid Dewberry brought a heightened sensitivity to the value of taking public sentiment into account.

    Understanding People

    In the 70s, the public began demanding more say about the quality and style of the built environment. Engineers involved in public-sector work were encouraged to hone their listening skills, and patience, as public forums often were contentious. Dewberry’s experience in multi-party development projects gave it a leg up over the competition. Sid Dewberry brought a heightened sensitivity to the value of taking public sentiment into account.

  • Environmental Engineering Rises

    In the 70s, environmental engineering emerged as a focused service. During this time, Dewberry designed a water system for Pulaski County, VA. Drawing on earlier infrastructure experience in the 50s when it designed the Southeast Relief Water Main in D.C., Dewberry rose to the challenge to deliver a higher level of environmental expertise.

    Environmental Engineering Rises

    In the 70s, environmental engineering emerged as a focused service. During this time, Dewberry designed a water system for Pulaski County, VA. Drawing on earlier infrastructure experience in the 50s when it designed the Southeast Relief Water Main in D.C., Dewberry rose to the challenge to deliver a higher level of environmental expertise.

  • Jim Nealon Retires

    Sid's handwritten note to employees said: "For everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven...I look at this as the end of the beginning...of a continuing process of the development and growth of a dynamic firm dedicated to high principles of ethical conduct in its relations to its employees, clients, and the public. This principle, more than anything else, marks Jim's contribution to the overwhelming success of DND."

    Jim Nealon Retires

    Sid's handwritten note to employees said: "For everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven...I look at this as the end of the beginning...of a continuing process of the development and growth of a dynamic firm dedicated to high principles of ethical conduct in its relations to its employees, clients, and the public. This principle, more than anything else, marks Jim's contribution to the overwhelming success of DND."

  • Diversification of Services

    Sid Dewberry says, "I'm thrilled when we rise to new opportunities." In 1974, HUD was looking for a firm to prepare detailed maps of flood-prone areas throughout the country. Within 18 months, Dewberry had 150 people assigned to the HUD mapping program. More than 40 years later, Dewberry has mapped and updated maps for more than 16,000 communities and enjoys a national reputation in floodplain analysis.

    Diversification of Services

    Sid Dewberry says, "I'm thrilled when we rise to new opportunities." In 1974, HUD was looking for a firm to prepare detailed maps of flood-prone areas throughout the country. Within 18 months, Dewberry had 150 people assigned to the HUD mapping program. More than 40 years later, Dewberry has mapped and updated maps for more than 16,000 communities and enjoys a national reputation in floodplain analysis.

  • Expanding the Firm’s Horizons

    As diversification became an increasingly important theme, Dewberry and his partners encouraged their associates to be innovative and entrepreneurial. Sid remarks, "As our knowledge base grows, one small initial job leads to larger ones. It's great. I love it." The HUD flood insurance mapping contract led to other mapping clients, such as the DoD and the U.S. Geological Survey. It also led to other kinds of work for what became FEMA. Disaster mitigation work has been central to the firm's services for the past 35 years.

    Expanding the Firm’s Horizons

    As diversification became an increasingly important theme, Dewberry and his partners encouraged their associates to be innovative and entrepreneurial. Sid remarks, "As our knowledge base grows, one small initial job leads to larger ones. It's great. I love it." The HUD flood insurance mapping contract led to other mapping clients, such as the DoD and the U.S. Geological Survey. It also led to other kinds of work for what became FEMA. Disaster mitigation work has been central to the firm's services for the past 35 years.

  • Barry Dewberry Joins the Company

    "I wasn't new to the firm by any means," says Barry. "I had spent a good bit of my childhood in Dad's office. And had worked there every summer while in school. But it was my first full-time job at the firm...it was supposed to be temporary, but this place has a way of capturing you."

    Barry Dewberry Joins the Company

    "I wasn't new to the firm by any means," says Barry. "I had spent a good bit of my childhood in Dad's office. And had worked there every summer while in school. But it was my first full-time job at the firm...it was supposed to be temporary, but this place has a way of capturing you."

  • 1980s

    Peaks and Valleys

    The 1980s marked a major transition in the U.S. economy. The Information Age arrived full force. New CADD technology offered more precision, and personal computers, cell phones, and the internet were about to change the ways business was done. The firm grew to 1,200 employees by 1987, and extended its geographic reach into Tennessee and North Carolina. Dewberry was ranked among the top 50 design firms by Engineering News-Record. Real Estate sizzled for most of the decade until 1989 when the market entered a sudden deep freeze. With much of the firm's portfolio directly or indirectly tied to real estate, Dewberry & Davis would refocus on diversification.

    1980s

    Peaks and Valleys

    The 1980s marked a major transition in the U.S. economy. The Information Age arrived full force. New CADD technology offered more precision, and personal computers, cell phones, and the internet were about to change the ways business was done. The firm grew to 1,200 employees by 1987, and extended its geographic reach into Tennessee and North Carolina. Dewberry was ranked among the top 50 design firms by Engineering News-Record. Real Estate sizzled for most of the decade until 1989 when the market entered a sudden deep freeze. With much of the firm's portfolio directly or indirectly tied to real estate, Dewberry & Davis would refocus on diversification.

  • Dulles Toll Road, Northern VA

    The firm's early days of designing culverts and community access roads had burgeoned into high-profile contracts to engineer major thoroughfares such as the Dulles Toll Road in Northern Virginia.

    Dulles Toll Road, Northern VA

    The firm's early days of designing culverts and community access roads had burgeoned into high-profile contracts to engineer major thoroughfares such as the Dulles Toll Road in Northern Virginia.

  • New Headquarters

    The firm's 25th anniversary in 1981 was celebrated in grand style. A beautiful new corporate headquarters rose at 8401 Arlington Boulevard in Fairfax. The building was graced by the firm's new official name—Dewberry & Davis—and punctuated with the now familiar “berry” icon. The firm's 600 employees quickly settled into the elegant six-story glass-and-steel structure that would serve as home for the next quarter century and beyond.

    New Headquarters

    The firm's 25th anniversary in 1981 was celebrated in grand style. A beautiful new corporate headquarters rose at 8401 Arlington Boulevard in Fairfax. The building was graced by the firm's new official name—Dewberry & Davis—and punctuated with the now familiar “berry” icon. The firm's 600 employees quickly settled into the elegant six-story glass-and-steel structure that would serve as home for the next quarter century and beyond.

  • One Franklin Square

    This extensive project included 670,000 square feet of office space, 30,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and 300,000 square feet of garage. IBM occupied half of the building as the main tenant. Dewberry was responsible for the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, fire alarm, and controls engineering. The building was designed by Hartman-Cox of Washington, D.C., with Dewberry serving as architect-of-record.

    One Franklin Square

    This extensive project included 670,000 square feet of office space, 30,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and 300,000 square feet of garage. IBM occupied half of the building as the main tenant. Dewberry was responsible for the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, fire alarm, and controls engineering. The building was designed by Hartman-Cox of Washington, D.C., with Dewberry serving as architect-of-record.

  • TOLK, Inc.

    TOLK, Inc. was the first firm to be acquired by Dewberry. Company founder G. Lee Kendrick became director of Dewberry & Davis's mechanical/electrical division. The mid-Atlantic MEP group has designed building systems for some of the region's most-recognized signature buildings, including One Franklin Square (D.C.), the Gannett/USA Today headquarters (McLean, VA), One and Two Freedom Square (Reston, VA), and the NPR Headquarters ( D.C.).

    TOLK, Inc.

    TOLK, Inc. was the first firm to be acquired by Dewberry. Company founder G. Lee Kendrick became director of Dewberry & Davis's mechanical/electrical division. The mid-Atlantic MEP group has designed building systems for some of the region's most-recognized signature buildings, including One Franklin Square (D.C.), the Gannett/USA Today headquarters (McLean, VA), One and Two Freedom Square (Reston, VA), and the NPR Headquarters ( D.C.).

  • John P. Fowler, PE

    John P. Fowler joined the firm in 1983 in order to further develop the transportation business. The firm had past experience, including the Dulles Toll Road in 1981, but John knew this market on a deeper level. Under John's leadership, the transportation practice grew to a significant percentage of the firm's annual portfolio. He also led the acquisition and integration of Goodkind & O’Dea, which gave the firm a major presence in the Northeast market and a large-scale footprint in transportation. John is a member of Dewberry's Board of Directors.

    John P. Fowler, PE

    John P. Fowler joined the firm in 1983 in order to further develop the transportation business. The firm had past experience, including the Dulles Toll Road in 1981, but John knew this market on a deeper level. Under John's leadership, the transportation practice grew to a significant percentage of the firm's annual portfolio. He also led the acquisition and integration of Goodkind & O’Dea, which gave the firm a major presence in the Northeast market and a large-scale footprint in transportation. John is a member of Dewberry's Board of Directors.

  • Tysons II

    One of the more glamorous projects from the 80s was Tysons II. This project was a $550-million, 107-acre mixed-use development effort, consisting of retail and office facilities, and supported by $14 million in traffic improvements. The complex contains a three-level "galleria" style shopping mall, two hotels, 12 office towers, and more than 12,900 parking spaces.

    Tysons II

    One of the more glamorous projects from the 80s was Tysons II. This project was a $550-million, 107-acre mixed-use development effort, consisting of retail and office facilities, and supported by $14 million in traffic improvements. The complex contains a three-level "galleria" style shopping mall, two hotels, 12 office towers, and more than 12,900 parking spaces.

  • Harold Williams, PE, CL.S

    Harold Williams, PE, CL.S was an engineer and director of special projects for Dewberry for 20 years until his death in 1987. Harold exemplified the exceptional qualities of leadership, professionalism, and technical excellence while mentoring multiple staff. His memory is honored each year as Dewberry selects an awardee for the Harold Williams Award.

    Harold Williams, PE, CL.S

    Harold Williams, PE, CL.S was an engineer and director of special projects for Dewberry for 20 years until his death in 1987. Harold exemplified the exceptional qualities of leadership, professionalism, and technical excellence while mentoring multiple staff. His memory is honored each year as Dewberry selects an awardee for the Harold Williams Award.

  • The Awards for Excellence

    In addition to the outside recognition the firm regularly receives from clients, peers, and industry associations, Dewberry annually bestows its "Awards for Excellence." Categories include Architectural Design, Building Engineering Services, Collaboration and Cross-Sales, Community Based/Community Engagement, Community Risk Management Services, Site/Civil Design, Transportation Infrastructure, and Water, Water Resources, and Environmental Engineering.

    The Awards for Excellence

    In addition to the outside recognition the firm regularly receives from clients, peers, and industry associations, Dewberry annually bestows its "Awards for Excellence." Categories include Architectural Design, Building Engineering Services, Collaboration and Cross-Sales, Community Based/Community Engagement, Community Risk Management Services, Site/Civil Design, Transportation Infrastructure, and Water, Water Resources, and Environmental Engineering.

  • Goodkind & O'Dea

    Having earned a reputation for highway and bridge expertise in the Northeast, by the 1980s Goodkind & O'Dea had diversified into urban renewal, water resources, and municipal infrastructure work. Key projects included the I-287 Expressway in New Jersey and the Riverside Drive Viaduct Rehabilitation in New York City. Acquired in 1989, the deal propelled Dewberry into the Northeast and deeper into the transportation infrastructure business.

    Goodkind & O'Dea

    Having earned a reputation for highway and bridge expertise in the Northeast, by the 1980s Goodkind & O'Dea had diversified into urban renewal, water resources, and municipal infrastructure work. Key projects included the I-287 Expressway in New Jersey and the Riverside Drive Viaduct Rehabilitation in New York City. Acquired in 1989, the deal propelled Dewberry into the Northeast and deeper into the transportation infrastructure business.

  • 1990s

    Winning Combinations

    As the 1990s opened, the land development and building market evaporated, which took a toll on Dewberry's land development business. Billings shrank 20% and staff fell 30% in just one year. What buffered Dewberry from this downturn in the land development business was growth in the transportation market, disaster response work for FEMA, and several key acquisitions, which allowed the firm to expand its services even more, and further extend its geographic presence. By the end of the decade the economy had brightened, Dewberry had doubled in size, and the firm was ready for even more diverse challenges.

    1990s

    Winning Combinations

    As the 1990s opened, the land development and building market evaporated, which took a toll on Dewberry's land development business. Billings shrank 20% and staff fell 30% in just one year. What buffered Dewberry from this downturn in the land development business was growth in the transportation market, disaster response work for FEMA, and several key acquisitions, which allowed the firm to expand its services even more, and further extend its geographic presence. By the end of the decade the economy had brightened, Dewberry had doubled in size, and the firm was ready for even more diverse challenges.

  • Dulles Greenway

    Growth in the transportation business came just at the right time for Dewberry in the early 90s,. The Dulles Greenway is a 14-mile toll road extension from Dulles Airport to the town of Leesburg, VA. Dewberry's work included fast-track design and construction of eight interchanges, 36 bridges, including 13 hydraulic structures with eight curved girder bridges. Work was concluded in 1995.

    Dulles Greenway

    Growth in the transportation business came just at the right time for Dewberry in the early 90s,. The Dulles Greenway is a 14-mile toll road extension from Dulles Airport to the town of Leesburg, VA. Dewberry's work included fast-track design and construction of eight interchanges, 36 bridges, including 13 hydraulic structures with eight curved girder bridges. Work was concluded in 1995.

  • Hurricane Andrew

    Hurricane Andrew caused $26.5 billion in damage with most of that damage occurring in south Florida. This was the costliest hurricane in history up until that point, surpassed only by Katrina in 2005. Andrew was first rated a Category 4 storm but at its 10-year anniversary it was upgraded to a category 5. Dewberry expanded its FEMA disaster response work with Andrew, and has been involved heavily ever since.

    Hurricane Andrew

    Hurricane Andrew caused $26.5 billion in damage with most of that damage occurring in south Florida. This was the costliest hurricane in history up until that point, surpassed only by Katrina in 2005. Andrew was first rated a Category 4 storm but at its 10-year anniversary it was upgraded to a category 5. Dewberry expanded its FEMA disaster response work with Andrew, and has been involved heavily ever since.

  • Womack Army Medical Center

    Dewberry was responsible for the site and utility planning and design, including major transportation and utility infrastructure plus all hardscape and landscaping designs for this $250 million federally funded medical campus. Dewberry was presented with the Charles F. Trainer Award for Design from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District for this important project.

    Womack Army Medical Center

    Dewberry was responsible for the site and utility planning and design, including major transportation and utility infrastructure plus all hardscape and landscaping designs for this $250 million federally funded medical campus. Dewberry was presented with the Charles F. Trainer Award for Design from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District for this important project.

  • Disaster Assistance

    For more than 20 years, emergency management has been a core service for the firm. As one of FEMA's largest contractors, Dewberry plays a significant role in the national effort to reduce the impact of both natural and man-made hazards on people, property, governmental operations, and the economy. Working with federal, state, and municipal clients, Dewberry has gained significant work experience in its service throughout the nation.

    Disaster Assistance

    For more than 20 years, emergency management has been a core service for the firm. As one of FEMA's largest contractors, Dewberry plays a significant role in the national effort to reduce the impact of both natural and man-made hazards on people, property, governmental operations, and the economy. Working with federal, state, and municipal clients, Dewberry has gained significant work experience in its service throughout the nation.

  • Land Development Handbook

    Now in its third edition, Dewberry's Land Development Handbook is considered an indispensable guide to the complex process of land development and is used by engineers, planners, surveyors, architects, attorneys, developers, and others involved in the process. The handbook contains more than 700 illustrations, including diagrams, detailed drawings, plats, and reports generated at the various planning and design phases through the life cycle of a land development project.

    Land Development Handbook

    Now in its third edition, Dewberry's Land Development Handbook is considered an indispensable guide to the complex process of land development and is used by engineers, planners, surveyors, architects, attorneys, developers, and others involved in the process. The handbook contains more than 700 illustrations, including diagrams, detailed drawings, plats, and reports generated at the various planning and design phases through the life cycle of a land development project.

  • HTB, Inc.

    Founded in 1942, Hudgins, Thompson, and Ball, Inc. grew to be one of the largest design, engineering, and planning firms in the country within its first decade. By the 60s, the firm had an international presence and began focusing on its growing architecture practice. The 130-member company was acquired by Dewberry in 1996 and renamed Dewberry Design Group with offices in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, OK, and Arlington, VA.

    HTB, Inc.

    Founded in 1942, Hudgins, Thompson, and Ball, Inc. grew to be one of the largest design, engineering, and planning firms in the country within its first decade. By the 60s, the firm had an international presence and began focusing on its growing architecture practice. The 130-member company was acquired by Dewberry in 1996 and renamed Dewberry Design Group with offices in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, OK, and Arlington, VA.

  • Other Acquisitions of the 90s

    There were six key acquisitions in the 90s, all contributing to fresh talent, new services, and greater geographic reach. They were Capitol Engineering Group, 1993; Genovese & Associates, 1995; Cockinos & Associates, 1997; Beavin & Company, 1997; Kniseley & Associates, 1998; and Anderson-Nichols & Company, Inc., 1999.

    Other Acquisitions of the 90s

    There were six key acquisitions in the 90s, all contributing to fresh talent, new services, and greater geographic reach. They were Capitol Engineering Group, 1993; Genovese & Associates, 1995; Cockinos & Associates, 1997; Beavin & Company, 1997; Kniseley & Associates, 1998; and Anderson-Nichols & Company, Inc., 1999.

  • Growth

    By the end of the 1990s, the firm offered expertise in more areas than ever, ranging from architectural and traditional engineering to highly specialized services like disaster assistance, coastal erosion studies, and hazardous materials management. Dewberry grew to 26 offices, including Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, and Oakland, CA. Annual billings exceeded $150 million and the staff grew to nearly 1,600 employees.

    Growth

    By the end of the 1990s, the firm offered expertise in more areas than ever, ranging from architectural and traditional engineering to highly specialized services like disaster assistance, coastal erosion studies, and hazardous materials management. Dewberry grew to 26 offices, including Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, and Oakland, CA. Annual billings exceeded $150 million and the staff grew to nearly 1,600 employees.

  • 2000s

    Transitions

    The 2000s opened on an upbeat note—the tantalizing promise of reaching a major milestone. In 2004, Dewberry surpassed annual billings of $200 million. The decade was also notable for transitions in leadership and consolidation of corporate culture. Numerous acquisitions over the years expanded reach and services, and the firm now focused on unifying under the name “Dewberry.” The change was subtle, but possessed great symbolic value. The name highlights the continuity of the Dewberry family throughout its history, while signifying unification and integration. Acquisition, diversification, expansion, and growth over the years meant adding more people. The unifying name change helped everyone feel part of the same firm, the same family.

    2000s

    Transitions

    The 2000s opened on an upbeat note—the tantalizing promise of reaching a major milestone. In 2004, Dewberry surpassed annual billings of $200 million. The decade was also notable for transitions in leadership and consolidation of corporate culture. Numerous acquisitions over the years expanded reach and services, and the firm now focused on unifying under the name “Dewberry.” The change was subtle, but possessed great symbolic value. The name highlights the continuity of the Dewberry family throughout its history, while signifying unification and integration. Acquisition, diversification, expansion, and growth over the years meant adding more people. The unifying name change helped everyone feel part of the same firm, the same family.

  • Leadership Changes

    Two major leadership changes took place in the 2000s, brought on by Barry Dewberry’s decision to step down as CEO of the firm. Barry’s numerous contributions as both COO and CEO in the 1990s would be missed. From his tireless campaign in the 90s to improve systems through the business advisory group, to his focus on information technology, marketing, and financial controls, Barry left an indelible mark on the firm. After Barry’s departure John Fowler was the natural choice for CEO. A nationwide search was launched for the vacant COO role, and Ronald L. Ewing was selected, bringing 25 years of engineering and management experience to the post, as well as a particular expertise in civil engineering and land surveying.

    Leadership Changes

    Two major leadership changes took place in the 2000s, brought on by Barry Dewberry’s decision to step down as CEO of the firm. Barry’s numerous contributions as both COO and CEO in the 1990s would be missed. From his tireless campaign in the 90s to improve systems through the business advisory group, to his focus on information technology, marketing, and financial controls, Barry left an indelible mark on the firm. After Barry’s departure John Fowler was the natural choice for CEO. A nationwide search was launched for the vacant COO role, and Ronald L. Ewing was selected, bringing 25 years of engineering and management experience to the post, as well as a particular expertise in civil engineering and land surveying.

  • Pentagon Bypass

    Part of the Pentagon Renovation Program, the bypass involved the relocation of Route 110 for about 3,500 feet and provided improvements to the existing Pentagon road and site access network, to address security issues. Dewberry was part of a design-build team, with Facchina Construction Company, to complete the design and construction of this $35 million, six-lane urban freeway, while maintaining the transportation and communication needs of the Pentagon.

    Pentagon Bypass

    Part of the Pentagon Renovation Program, the bypass involved the relocation of Route 110 for about 3,500 feet and provided improvements to the existing Pentagon road and site access network, to address security issues. Dewberry was part of a design-build team, with Facchina Construction Company, to complete the design and construction of this $35 million, six-lane urban freeway, while maintaining the transportation and communication needs of the Pentagon.

  • Phillips Swager Associates (PSA)

    PSA began modestly in 1954 by designing a four-classroom schoolhouse in Pontiac, IL. The firm expanded quickly as did its reputation for public architecture—from schools, churches, and libraries to hospitals, courthouses, jails, and community centers. PSA opened offices in Texas and Virginia, teaming with Dewberry for the first time in 1983. In 2004 Dewberry acquired the 160-person firm.

    Phillips Swager Associates (PSA)

    PSA began modestly in 1954 by designing a four-classroom schoolhouse in Pontiac, IL. The firm expanded quickly as did its reputation for public architecture—from schools, churches, and libraries to hospitals, courthouses, jails, and community centers. PSA opened offices in Texas and Virginia, teaming with Dewberry for the first time in 1983. In 2004 Dewberry acquired the 160-person firm.

  • Hurricane Katrina

    In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita wreaked havoc in the Gulf Coast. This natural disaster was the costliest in the history of the U.S, with losses over $80 billion. Through its FEMA contracts, Dewberry sent 250 employees to work in the region, and established a project office initially in Baton Rouge, and later in New Orleans, LA. Dewberry provided public assistance in many ways including inspecting houses, assessing the damage, and planning for continuation of emergency governmental programs such as temporary facilities for criminal justice and courts system.

    Hurricane Katrina

    In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita wreaked havoc in the Gulf Coast. This natural disaster was the costliest in the history of the U.S, with losses over $80 billion. Through its FEMA contracts, Dewberry sent 250 employees to work in the region, and established a project office initially in Baton Rouge, and later in New Orleans, LA. Dewberry provided public assistance in many ways including inspecting houses, assessing the damage, and planning for continuation of emergency governmental programs such as temporary facilities for criminal justice and courts system.

  • GIS

    Recognizing the importance and imminent prevalence of geospatial-enabled tools, Dewberry created a geospatial practice. With some of the industry’s most recognized and respected thought leaders on board, Dewberry creates, analyzes, and builds tools to share geospatial data and simplify the use of information to allow for more effective and efficient decision making. Through projects like the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment and mapping the state of Alaska, Dewberry has also become a leader in remote sensing.

    GIS

    Recognizing the importance and imminent prevalence of geospatial-enabled tools, Dewberry created a geospatial practice. With some of the industry’s most recognized and respected thought leaders on board, Dewberry creates, analyzes, and builds tools to share geospatial data and simplify the use of information to allow for more effective and efficient decision making. Through projects like the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment and mapping the state of Alaska, Dewberry has also become a leader in remote sensing.

  • Atlantic Terminal, Brooklyn

    A $65 million mixed-use, office tower and four-story retail space was constructed above Brooklyn’s historic Flatbush Terminal, the third-largest transportation hub in New York City. Both the Long Island Rail Road and New York City subway remained operational during construction. Dewberry was structural engineer for the retail space.

    Atlantic Terminal, Brooklyn

    A $65 million mixed-use, office tower and four-story retail space was constructed above Brooklyn’s historic Flatbush Terminal, the third-largest transportation hub in New York City. Both the Long Island Rail Road and New York City subway remained operational during construction. Dewberry was structural engineer for the retail space.

  • 2010s

    2010 and Beyond

    With strong practice area, service line, and regional leadership, as well as subject matter expertise, we continue to expand our services, including resilience, sustainable design, alternative delivery, and energy infrastructure. We've opened new offices in Florida, Alabama, Texas, Colorado, and California, creating a truly national footprint. Driven by tomorrow's technology and our core values, we maintain our unwavering commitment to client service, visionary thinking, and technical excellence.

    2010s

    2010 and Beyond

    With strong practice area, service line, and regional leadership, as well as subject matter expertise, we continue to expand our services, including resilience, sustainable design, alternative delivery, and energy infrastructure. We've opened new offices in Florida, Alabama, Texas, Colorado, and California, creating a truly national footprint. Driven by tomorrow's technology and our core values, we maintain our unwavering commitment to client service, visionary thinking, and technical excellence.

  • Protecting At-Risk Communities

    Dewberry has long been a trusted advisor to FEMA. When the agency sought assistance under its Risk MAP program, we formed a powerful joint venture. FEMA awarded the joint venture a five-year, $600-million contract to provide flood plain mapping, GIS, and hazard risk mitigation services to FEMA HQs as well as FEMA Regions II, III and VI.

    Protecting At-Risk Communities

    Dewberry has long been a trusted advisor to FEMA. When the agency sought assistance under its Risk MAP program, we formed a powerful joint venture. FEMA awarded the joint venture a five-year, $600-million contract to provide flood plain mapping, GIS, and hazard risk mitigation services to FEMA HQs as well as FEMA Regions II, III and VI.

  • Using 3-D Design Technology

    As a strategy to reduce the nutrient load to the receiving water from the Lorton wastewater treatment facilities, Fairfax County Water turned to Dewberry to plan, design, and oversee the construction of a pumping facility and pipeline to deliver treated wastewater to water reuse customers. Through the use of 3-D technology, Dewberry was able to optimize the routing of the five-mile pipeline in a congested urban highway corridor to minimize environmental impacts and utility conflicts, thereby streamlining the permitting process and accelerating the construction schedule of the $15.2 million project.

    Using 3-D Design Technology

    As a strategy to reduce the nutrient load to the receiving water from the Lorton wastewater treatment facilities, Fairfax County Water turned to Dewberry to plan, design, and oversee the construction of a pumping facility and pipeline to deliver treated wastewater to water reuse customers. Through the use of 3-D technology, Dewberry was able to optimize the routing of the five-mile pipeline in a congested urban highway corridor to minimize environmental impacts and utility conflicts, thereby streamlining the permitting process and accelerating the construction schedule of the $15.2 million project.

  • Protecting Coastal Communities

    With 2,300-plus square miles of vulnerable land, North Carolina risks losing trillions of dollars in assets to rising sea levels. In 2009, Dewberry began collaborating with the Geospatial and Technology Management Office of the state’s Division of Emergency Management to kick off the North Carolina Sea Level Rise Risk Management Study, which will identify potential impacts related to sea level rise, coastal flooding, and erosion for 20 coastal counties projecting forward through 2100.

    Protecting Coastal Communities

    With 2,300-plus square miles of vulnerable land, North Carolina risks losing trillions of dollars in assets to rising sea levels. In 2009, Dewberry began collaborating with the Geospatial and Technology Management Office of the state’s Division of Emergency Management to kick off the North Carolina Sea Level Rise Risk Management Study, which will identify potential impacts related to sea level rise, coastal flooding, and erosion for 20 coastal counties projecting forward through 2100.

  • Building Information Modeling

    We look to today’s advanced and innovative technologies to inform our approach and add value for our clients. Building Information Modeling (BIM) applications brings an entirely different approach to facilities design. BIM enables our clients to capture intelligent and critically important data starting with the planning and design phases. We continue to advance technology applications using BIM, GIS, and other 3-D models to provide a fully integrated platform for asset management.

    Building Information Modeling

    We look to today’s advanced and innovative technologies to inform our approach and add value for our clients. Building Information Modeling (BIM) applications brings an entirely different approach to facilities design. BIM enables our clients to capture intelligent and critically important data starting with the planning and design phases. We continue to advance technology applications using BIM, GIS, and other 3-D models to provide a fully integrated platform for asset management.

  • Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    Keeping with our tradition of supporting our nation's military and their families, we provided sustainable civil and utilities infrastructure design solutions for the $806-million Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Virginia. We also provided design services for the 27,100-square-foot central utility plant, parking structures, a helipad, and an ambulance shelter. Dewberry volunteers even joined 100 others to clean the banks of Dogue Creek across from the complex as part of our stream restoration project design.

    Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    Keeping with our tradition of supporting our nation's military and their families, we provided sustainable civil and utilities infrastructure design solutions for the $806-million Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Virginia. We also provided design services for the 27,100-square-foot central utility plant, parking structures, a helipad, and an ambulance shelter. Dewberry volunteers even joined 100 others to clean the banks of Dogue Creek across from the complex as part of our stream restoration project design.

  • Intercounty Connector

    In order to connect major business areas and communities in Maryland, Dewberry provided lead design services, as well as construction administration and inspection services, for Contract C of the 18.8-mile Intercounty Connector (ICC) project for the Maryland State Highway Administration. This $513-million, design-build project includes 3.8 miles of the six-lane ICC roadway, more than 20 bridges, and three-level interchanges at Route 29 and I-95.

    Intercounty Connector

    In order to connect major business areas and communities in Maryland, Dewberry provided lead design services, as well as construction administration and inspection services, for Contract C of the 18.8-mile Intercounty Connector (ICC) project for the Maryland State Highway Administration. This $513-million, design-build project includes 3.8 miles of the six-lane ICC roadway, more than 20 bridges, and three-level interchanges at Route 29 and I-95.

  • Leadership Changes

    On April 2, 2010, Donald E. Stone, Jr., PE, began serving as the firm’s new CEO. Stone succeeded Ronald L. Ewing, PE, RLS, a highly respected professional and leader, who had been with Dewberry since 2002, when he was brought on board as COO. Stone joined Dewberry in December 2008 and had been serving as Dewberry’s COO and infrastructure engineering services practice area leader. In addition, Dan M. Pleasant, PE, whose career spanned several leadership positions over 30 years with Dewberry, most recently as president of Dewberry’s southeast division, was chosen as the new COO.

    Leadership Changes

    On April 2, 2010, Donald E. Stone, Jr., PE, began serving as the firm’s new CEO. Stone succeeded Ronald L. Ewing, PE, RLS, a highly respected professional and leader, who had been with Dewberry since 2002, when he was brought on board as COO. Stone joined Dewberry in December 2008 and had been serving as Dewberry’s COO and infrastructure engineering services practice area leader. In addition, Dan M. Pleasant, PE, whose career spanned several leadership positions over 30 years with Dewberry, most recently as president of Dewberry’s southeast division, was chosen as the new COO.

  • Re-Entry Facilities Design

    In an effort to reduce recidivism among released inmates, the California Department of Correctional Rehabilitation engaged Dewberry to design three prototypical re-entry facilities across the state. From the materials used to the layout of vocational, physical, emotional, educational and medical rehabilitation spaces, our architects designed facilities that will help increase the odds that released prisoners will return to their communities prepared for a productive re-entry into society.

    Re-Entry Facilities Design

    In an effort to reduce recidivism among released inmates, the California Department of Correctional Rehabilitation engaged Dewberry to design three prototypical re-entry facilities across the state. From the materials used to the layout of vocational, physical, emotional, educational and medical rehabilitation spaces, our architects designed facilities that will help increase the odds that released prisoners will return to their communities prepared for a productive re-entry into society.

  • Alternative Delivery

    With the historical underfunding of our nation’s public infrastructure, our clients have looked for alternative delivery and financing approaches to renew and expand their public infrastructure. We have embraced these alternative approaches and matched them to unique needs and situations. From rural schools system programs to major federal domestic and international building programs; from wastewater facility upgrades to complex billion-dollar highway projects, we leverage our knowledge and experience with alternative delivery approaches to help our clients successfully meet their challenging infrastructure and capital program goals.

    Alternative Delivery

    With the historical underfunding of our nation’s public infrastructure, our clients have looked for alternative delivery and financing approaches to renew and expand their public infrastructure. We have embraced these alternative approaches and matched them to unique needs and situations. From rural schools system programs to major federal domestic and international building programs; from wastewater facility upgrades to complex billion-dollar highway projects, we leverage our knowledge and experience with alternative delivery approaches to help our clients successfully meet their challenging infrastructure and capital program goals.

  • Integra Engineering

    Integra Engineering was established in 1995 in Denver. The 26-person company provided planning, design, construction, and operational services to municipal and utility clients for water and wastewater infrastructure. Integra was well-known throughout Colorado for municipal water and wastewater facility engineering and greatly enhanced Dewberry’s existing capabilities, as well as gave it a firm foothold in the West.

    Integra Engineering

    Integra Engineering was established in 1995 in Denver. The 26-person company provided planning, design, construction, and operational services to municipal and utility clients for water and wastewater infrastructure. Integra was well-known throughout Colorado for municipal water and wastewater facility engineering and greatly enhanced Dewberry’s existing capabilities, as well as gave it a firm foothold in the West.

  • Leadership Changes

    "On behalf of the Board of Directors, it is my distinct pleasure and honor to announce that Barry has been elected to Chairman of the Board. Barry has been planning and preparing himself for this role since joining Dewberry 37 years ago. He has already filled just about every position in this company and is fully prepared and able to take on this new role. To our clients and colleagues, I appreciate your dedication to this company and your support of Barry as he becomes our new Chairman."

    Leadership Changes

    "On behalf of the Board of Directors, it is my distinct pleasure and honor to announce that Barry has been elected to Chairman of the Board. Barry has been planning and preparing himself for this role since joining Dewberry 37 years ago. He has already filled just about every position in this company and is fully prepared and able to take on this new role. To our clients and colleagues, I appreciate your dedication to this company and your support of Barry as he becomes our new Chairman."

  • Barry Dewberry on Looking Forward

    “As for the future, the family is lucky to have seen the day when Dewberry has proven that it can continue long into the future and do just fine without one of us running the place day to day. We will stay intimately involved in determining the firm’s direction and strategies. We want to see the culture that has been so successful continue.”

    Barry Dewberry on Looking Forward

    “As for the future, the family is lucky to have seen the day when Dewberry has proven that it can continue long into the future and do just fine without one of us running the place day to day. We will stay intimately involved in determining the firm’s direction and strategies. We want to see the culture that has been so successful continue.”

  • Bowyer-Singleton Associates (BSA)

    Bowyer-Singleton was established in 1972 to serve the growing Orlando, FL, region. The firm offered full-service engineering and surveying, concentrating first on the land development market, then adding transportation engineering services in the mid 1970s. The firm continued to expand, adding planning and environmental services as well as four more offices across Florida. In 2013 Dewberry acquired the 90-person firm, bringing Dewberry’s presence in the southeast and Gulf Coast region to 160 employees and 11 locations.

    Bowyer-Singleton Associates (BSA)

    Bowyer-Singleton was established in 1972 to serve the growing Orlando, FL, region. The firm offered full-service engineering and surveying, concentrating first on the land development market, then adding transportation engineering services in the mid 1970s. The firm continued to expand, adding planning and environmental services as well as four more offices across Florida. In 2013 Dewberry acquired the 90-person firm, bringing Dewberry’s presence in the southeast and Gulf Coast region to 160 employees and 11 locations.

  • Rueter-Hess Water Purification Facility

     

    We designed the nation's first, large-scale potable water treatment facility to use ceramic membrane filter technology. Designed for the Parker Water and Sanitation District in Parker, Colorado, the facility treats a combination of local surface water, alluvial water, and water recycled from reclamation plants. In addition, the facility uses an innovative recirculating powdered activated carbon (PAC) system to efficiently remove dissolved organic carbon compounds, such as pharmaceuticals, taste and odor compounds, disinfection byproduct precursors, and other unregulated trace organics prior to filtration.

     

    Rueter-Hess Water Purification Facility

     

    We designed the nation's first, large-scale potable water treatment facility to use ceramic membrane filter technology. Designed for the Parker Water and Sanitation District in Parker, Colorado, the facility treats a combination of local surface water, alluvial water, and water recycled from reclamation plants. In addition, the facility uses an innovative recirculating powdered activated carbon (PAC) system to efficiently remove dissolved organic carbon compounds, such as pharmaceuticals, taste and odor compounds, disinfection byproduct precursors, and other unregulated trace organics prior to filtration.

     

  • Wilson Architectural Group

    In 2015, Dewberry acquired the nearly 40-person firm. With a portfolio of healthcare, corporate and commercial, industrial, sports and recreation, laboratories, and civic buildings, the firm’s technical strength and portfolio complemented Dewberry’s existing architectural practice in the region. Founding partner Gary Wilson established Wilson Architectural Group in 1988 to serve the Houston, Texas, region. The firm offered architectural and design services in programming, master planning, architectural design, construction management, registered interior design, state certified accessibility personnel, and project management.

    Wilson Architectural Group

    In 2015, Dewberry acquired the nearly 40-person firm. With a portfolio of healthcare, corporate and commercial, industrial, sports and recreation, laboratories, and civic buildings, the firm’s technical strength and portfolio complemented Dewberry’s existing architectural practice in the region. Founding partner Gary Wilson established Wilson Architectural Group in 1988 to serve the Houston, Texas, region. The firm offered architectural and design services in programming, master planning, architectural design, construction management, registered interior design, state certified accessibility personnel, and project management.

  • Preble-Rish 

    In 2016, Dewberry acquired Preble-Rish. Well known throughout the Florida Panhandle and coastal Alabama, the 120-person, full-service consulting engineering and surveying firm delivered engineering, surveying, grant writing, contract administration, and construction inspection services to counties, cities, towns, schools, and utility companies as well as several private-sector clients. In joining Dewberry, the firm brought with them a legacy of strong client and community relationships.

    Preble-Rish 

    In 2016, Dewberry acquired Preble-Rish. Well known throughout the Florida Panhandle and coastal Alabama, the 120-person, full-service consulting engineering and surveying firm delivered engineering, surveying, grant writing, contract administration, and construction inspection services to counties, cities, towns, schools, and utility companies as well as several private-sector clients. In joining Dewberry, the firm brought with them a legacy of strong client and community relationships.