Recognized as the largest waterway debris removal in U.S. history, the program spanned more than 100,000 cubic miles of debris and 360,000 cubic yards of sediment.

Waterway Debris Program Management

New Jersey

Helping New Jersey's Waterway Recover from Superstorm Sandy Debris

New Jersey's recovery after Superstorm Sandy hinged on the success of the waterway debris removal along the state's 127-mile coast. Debris clogged recreational and commercial waters, impacting New Jersey's coastal environments and economic livelihood. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) selected us to plan and manage a state-level, regionally organized program to remove and monitor debris removal in sensitive environments while maximizing Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reimbursement. We collaborated with state and federal environmental resource agencies and FEMA to devise solutions to expedite safe reopening of the waterways.

We worked with the NJDEP Threatened and Endangered (T&E) Species Unit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to develop protocols to allow the debris removal to advance while maintaining regulatory compliance and protecting breeding and nesting areas. Our maritime archaeologists reviewed side scan sonar data to identify potentially historic sites, conducted site reconnaissance, and mapped objects and their buffers. The debris removal activities revealed more than 1,500 unknown potentially historic resources including pilings, piers, ships, and a Civil War-era barge.

Recognized as the largest waterway debris removal in U.S. history, the program yielded long-term benefits including relief mapping of state tidal waterways, updated threatened and endangered species data, inventory of newly identified potentially historic submerged objects, and sediment reuse for beach replenishment and resilience.

Search Term:
Sandy Waterway Debris Removal
  • Sandy Waterway Debris Removal
  • State/Local
  • emergency management
  • resilience
  • environmental
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Learn more about Sandy Waterway Debris Removal

194

vessels and vehicles removed

6,019

submerged targets

>100,000

cubic yards of debris

>360,000

cubic yards of sediment

Services

  • Water
  • Resilience
  • Environmental
  • Emergency Management

Markets

  • State/Local

Regions

  • Northeast
  • Sandy Waterway Debris Removal
  • State/Local
  • emergency management
  • resilience
  • environmental

Location

New Jersey

Completion Date

2013

Client

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Awards

2014 Honor Award | ACECNJ
2014 National Recognition Award | ACEC

Cost

$157 million